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Glue Words (Review)

We have studied three types of sentences:

Type Definition Example

simple

only 1 clause

I ate a burger.

compound

2 or more independent clauses; the subect of each clause is explicitely stated.

I ate a burger, and my friend watched TV.

 

hybrid

2 clauses, but only the subject of the first clause is explicitely stated; the subject of the second clause is implied. (The reader understands that the subject of the second clause is the same as the subject of the first clause).

Jim ate a burger and watched TV.

 

Next we will turn our attention to a fourth type of sentence—the complex sentence.

However, before we do, now would be a good time to review the glue words.


Glue Words

There are three categories of "glue words" that you must be able to recognize:

You can print out a list of them here.

Prepositions

  • about
  • above
  • according to
  • across
  • after*
  • against
  • along
  • along with
  • among
  • apart from
  • around
  • as*
  • as for
  • at
  • because of
  • before*
  • behind
  • below
  • beneath

  • beside
  • between
  • beyond
  • but* (except)
  • by
  • by means of
  • concerning
  • despite
  • down
  • during
  • except
  • except for
  • excepting
  • for
  • from
  • in
  • in addition to
  • in back of
  • in case of
  • in front of
  • in place of
  • inside
  • in spite of
  • instead of
  • into
  • like
  • near
  • next
  • next to
  • of
  • off
  • on
  • onto
  • on top of
  • out
  • out of
  • outside
  • over
  • past

  • regarding
  • round
  • since*
  • through
  • throughout
  • till
  • to
  • toward
  • under
  • underneath
  • unlike
  • until*
  • up
  • upon
  • up to
  • with
  • within
  • without

 

Coordinating Conjunctions (Fanboys)

  • for*
  • and 
  • nor
  • but *
  • or
  • yet
  • so
  • (then)


  • By far the most common fanboys are and, but, and so. You can pretty much forget the rest.
  • "For" is only a fanboy when it's used as an old-fashioned way of saying "because". That's less than 1% of the time. More than 99% of the time, "for" is a preposition.
  • "But" is almost always a fanboy. Very rarely, you might see it used as a preposition. The word "but" is only a preposition when it's used with the meaning of "except".
  • "Then" is not a true fanboy, but you can think of it as an "honorary fanboy".
  • "Nor" doesn't follow the usual rules. Try hard to forget that it exists.

 

Subordinating Conjunctions

  • after*
  • although
  • as*
  • as far as
  • as though
  • because
  • before*
  • even if
  • even though

 


  • if
  • inasmuch as
  • in case (that)
  • in order (that)
  • insofar as
  • in that
  • lest
  • no matter how
  • now that
  • once

  • only if
  • provided (that)
  • since*
  • supposing that
  • than****
  • though

 


  • till
  • unless
  • until*
  • when
  • whenever
  • where**
  • wherever
  • whereas
  • whether or not
  • while

 

* Words marked with a single asterisk can also function as prepositions.

** The word “where” is more commonly used to introduce an adjective clause or a noun clause.

*** These pairs express “degree” and do not follow the usual pattern.

**** The conjunction “than” is unusual in that the predicate of the subordinate clause is often omitted.


Instructions for the Quiz

Identify the underlined word.

Quiz